A Japanese Company Is Building A New Noah’s Ark To Save Humans From A Global Apocalypse

Follow America's fastest-growing news aggregator, Spreely News, and stay informed. You can find all of our articles plus information from your favorite Conservative voices. 

If the state of the world these last few years has left you feeling that the apocalypse looms, you might not be alone.

The U.S. Sun reported that Japanese developers N-Ark have plans for a giant floating city that could house 40,000 people during a catastrophic global event.

Judging by the name they have adopted, these aspirational developers have found incentive in the Old Testament story of the Great Flood (Genesis 6:9-8:19). One wonders, however, whether perhaps they should be looking to the New Testament, in particular to the Tribulation detailed in the Book of Revelation.

 

Those who anticipate Jesus Christ’s second coming are not alone. Belief in Christ’s inevitable return has deep roots in Christian history.

Perhaps the most famous (or infamous) example happened in the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century, when Baptist minister William Miller attracted thousands of followers by predicting that Christ would return sometime within the period between March 21, 1843, and March 21, 1844.

 

 

In his essay, “The World’s Last Night,” C.S. Lewis described the scene as only he could: “Thousands waited for the Lord at midnight on March 21st, and went home to a late breakfast on the 22nd followed by the jeers of a drunkard.”

There is no reason to suspect that the Japanese developers are a bunch of modern-day William Millers.

 

On the other hand, we may yet have cause to laugh at them, albeit for reasons unlike those of the playful drunkard.

According to the Sun report, the new floating city “would be resilient to an apocalypse.”

Furthermore, it would feature a “range of buildings, including a sports stadium,” along with “an undersea data [center] and medical research facilities.” In the new city, named “Dogen City,” everything would float. Buildings could be relocated easily by sailing them from one area to another.

“The doctrine of the Second Coming teaches us that we do not and cannot know when the world drama will end. The curtain may be rung down at any moment: say, before you have finished reading this paragraph,” Lewis wrote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ella Ford

Ella Ford

Leave a Replay

Sign up for our Newsletter

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit