Dutch Organization Funded By Bill And Melinda Gates Asks Children As Young As Four About Sex And Masturbation

Follow America's fastest-growing news aggregator, Spreely News, and stay informed. You can find all of our articles plus information from your favorite Conservative voices. 

A Dutch organization funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is facing scrutiny over one of its videos featuring children as young as four being asked wildly inappropriate questions about sex and masturbation.

While the Rutgers Foundation is desperately trying to deep-six the video, the right-wing Dutch populist party Forum voor Democratie has drawn attention to its contents in an effort to expose what the group is really up to, reported Reduxx.

Rutgers, like Planned Parenthood in the U.S., claims to be in the business of educating and supporting young people in sexual matters but also advocates for gender ideology and abortion appreciation in schools with the help of other activist groups.

The group states on its website, “We want young people to be free to enjoy their sexuality and relationships, while respecting the rights of others in an inclusive society,” admitting to advocating “for progressive language and norm-setting on sexuality education.”

 

 

Rutgers kicked off an initiative targeting children on March 20 called “What do I like?” as part of a national “Spring Jitters Week” campaign to expand sexual education in primary schools.

“Learning about your body, talking about what you like and a positive self-image. This is the focus this year during the Week of Spring Jitters, an annual project week about relationships, sexuality and resilience in special and primary education,” Rutgers wrote on its project page. “We want to make children think about what they like and teach them to express their wishes.”

“When children in primary education learn about their bodies, relationships and sexuality from a positive message, they know better what they like and what they don’t like,” said Elsbeth Reitzema, a so-called sex education expert at Rutgers.

Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan cited Reitzema and her work with Rutgers in an article last year in an effort to stand up her argument that contrary to the allegations of conservatives, parental groups, and Republicans, talking to kids about graphic sex acts wasn’t an issue of “grooming them to be abused by pedophiles.”

Rutgers, along with Khazan’s model sex-educator, went into Dutch elementary schools again this spring to provide children with a better comprehension of sexuality and sex acts from an early age so that they can be “better able to communicate … their wishes and limits and learn to treat each other more respectfully.”

According to Rutgers, “When children of primary school age reach out about sexuality, the conversations most often revolve around making love, fingering and jerking off, the first time, masturbation and kissing.”

The teacher-facing page for the initiative contains several videos to show kids, including “giving permission for children” and “first times – cumming.”

The particular video that impassioned the interest of Dutch anti-groomer groups was entitled “Wat vind ik fijn,” or “What do I like?”

Reduxx reported that the video focuses on children as young as four being questioned about their sexual inclinations.

In one scene, a 6-year-old boy named Loek appears alongside his gay guardians, one of whom asks, “Do you like it when someone is petting you?”

The boy shakes his head no, then the adult male asks, “And what about being tickled?”

After the boy answers in the affirmative, the man says, “Oh, we’ll have to do that every night then before you sleep.”

In another scene, a woman talks to a 9-year-old girl about ejaculation and the “nice feeling” she can attain via orgasm. The adult then describes the various parts of female genitalia to the little girl, emphasizing that she will get a “very nice feeling” from rubbing her “little button.”

“You can rub it with your finger,” stressed the woman.

A 4-year-old boy is pressed about his masturbation habits in another scene.

His alleged mother, asks him, “What about you? Do you ever play with your dick? Do you ever touch your willie?” … How does that feel? And when do you do that?”

Despite the boy’s bewilderment, the mother continues with more questions: “Do you do that when we’re eating? … Why don’t you do that in class?”

Another little boy is told in the video to refer to sex as “f***ing or sucking.”

 

The video was reportedly taken down just 24 hours after it appeared on Twitter. Rutgers alleged it had removed the video because it had been taken “out of context.”

“Unfortunately, there is quite a bit of fake news and misinformation … going around at the moment,” tweeted Rutgers. “We have also just taken a video offline, in which parents are talking to their child. The topics covered in the video are: learning about your body, talking about what you like and setting boundaries.”

“We find that the video is being taken out of context by some people online and used to spread misinformation,” wrote the organization, citing protection of the children involved as cause.

The right-wing populist part FVD spoke out against both Rutgers’ initiative and its video in late March, calling the “sexualization and indoctrination” of children “disgusting.”

 

Recognizing that Rutgers’ deleted video was revelatory of the group’s alleged sexualization of young children, FVD reposted the video to its own YouTube channel with the title, “Deleted video. Shocking sexualization of young children.”

According to the Dutch publication Algemeen Dagblad, an FVD spokesman suggested in a voice-over at the end of the video that it was “obvious Rutgers feels caught” and is doing everything it can “to cover [its] dirty tracks,” adding that it was matter of public interest to disclose what elementary-school children were being subjected to.

Rutgers reportedly attempted to get the video taken off YouTube, stating, “The parents and children have not given Forum permission to publish the images.”

Reduxx reported the sex group is now threatening to sue the FVD unless the video is taken down. At the time of publication, the video was still on YouTube.

TheBlaze recently detailed Tucker Carlson’s claims in his most recent Twitter video concerning the apparent societal effort to normalize child sexualization.

“One by one, with increasing speed, our old taboos have been struck down. Those that remain have lost their moral force. Stealing, flaunting your wealth, striking women, smoking marijuana on the street, shameless public hypocrisy, taking other people’s money for not working — all of these things” were previously viewed as “unacceptable in America,” Carlson said. “Not anymore.”

Carlson emphasized that child molestation is now “teetering on the edge of acceptability.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ella Ford

Ella Ford

Leave a Replay

Sign up for our Newsletter

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit